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Campbell Kids Celebrate Their 100th Birthday; Oh … To be a Kid for 100 Years!

CAMDEN, N.J.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jan. 9, 2004–In this day of
“makeover madness,” there are two 100 year-olds who needn’t worry
about a single wrinkle or gray hair — they’ll be kids forever.
They’re the Campbell Kids(TM), some of America’s most beloved icons.

Since their first appearance in 1904, the Campbell Kids have
become synonymous with Campbell Soup Company (NYSE:CPB) and are one of
the most recognized advertising symbols of all time. As icons of a
food brand, they have warmed many a heart, personifying warmth,
wholesomeness and nourishment.

Philadelphia artist Grace Drayton first sketched the kids at the
request of her husband, who was trying to capture Campbell’s streetcar
card advertising contract. They first appeared on streetcars and soon
after their introduction, they were used in all of the company’s
advertising.

Campbell’s use of the Campbell Kids in their advertising was
directly linked to key events in American history. The Campbell Kids
donned Red Cross uniforms and appeared as doctors and nurses in
advertisements throughout World War I. During the Great Depression,
the Campbell Kids appeared in advertisements supporting Franklin D.
Roosevelt’s National Relief Association, stating that “We Do Our
Part.” With America’s entrance into World War II, the Campbell Kids
were featured in a Life Magazine ad, urging Americans to “Buy War
Bonds.”

Since their creation, they have appeared in numerous magazine and
TV advertisements, and have been on soup can labels. Today, a Campbell
Kid is the official face of the Campbell’s Labels for Education
program and his happy face adorns more than 1.5 billion cans of soup
each year.

The Campbell Kids first arrived in 1904; the year Theodore
Roosevelt was first elected president. The Campbell Kids share their
birthday with the New York subway system, which opened in 1904. The
Campbell Kids are also the same age as other American favorites
including iced tea, hamburgers and ice cream cones, which were all
“discovered” at the 1904 World’s Fair. The Summer Olympics were held
in St. Louis in 1904, marking the first time the games were held in
the United States. The World Series was not held however, because the
New York Giants would not agree to play the Boston Red Sox.

Items and artifacts featuring the Campbell Kids have become
coveted licensed collectibles. Campbell has offered dozens of dolls
and novelties with their likenesses: salt and pepper shakers,
postcards, bobble head dolls, toy trucks, kitchen clocks and a host of
figurines. Every fall for the past 25 years, a new Campbell Kids
Christmas ornament, yearly calendar, and figurine or other novelty
item have been offered. The 2004 calendar features a historical
perspective of the Campbell Kids, with a montage of history, drawings
and artifacts.

As times have changed, so have the Campbell Kids. Their
captivating smiles, dimpled knees and round rosy cheeks have been
updated to mirror a more contemporary image. With the intent of
representing every girl and boy, they will always remain nameless, but
will never lose their playful smiles.

Although today’s Campbell Kids are indeed more modern looking and
could be depicted playing soccer, riding a skateboard, or doing
gymnastics, they’ll always be the Campbell Kids who symbolize the
wholesomeness and nourishment of Campbell’s soups…even at 100 years
old!

About Campbell Soup Company

Campbell Soup Company is a global manufacturer and marketer of
high quality soup, sauce, beverage, biscuit, confectionery and
prepared food products. The Company is 134 years old, with nearly $7
billion in annual sales and a portfolio of more than 20 market-leading
brands. For more information on the company, visit Campbell’s website
on the Internet at www.campbellsoup.com.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION & IMAGES, LOG ONTO
www.campbellkids100.com

CONTACT: Campbell Soup Company
Beth Jolly, 856-968-4301
[email protected]

SOURCE: Campbell Soup Company